An algae based economy

Planetary transformation should be to different methods of consumption that can sustain and increase human wealth and happiness.   In terms of the climate crisis, thinking on emission reduction needs to evolve into a new paradigm for a transformed ethic of human existence on our planet. The strain on world resources will only be managed through focus on technological transformation.

How I visualise a transformed world is one where the massive unused resources and energy of the world ocean become available through new simple large scale technology, and as a result the grossly inefficient traditional rural systems that perpetuate poverty and impact the environment can be replaced by new modern urban lifestyles in which people have a light ecological footprint but still have abundant energy and resources.

A shift to a high technology urban lifestyle, with materials mainly built from carbon, can create universal abundance for high human populations while also enhancing global biodiversity.  Failing to explore such a path leaves open the risk of catastrophe.

Current affluent lifestyles are not sustainable and replicable in the manner of the First World.   It is actually possible physically on our planet to shift the world economy to a system of abundance rather than scarcity, but this needs a paradigm shift in terms of both technology and culture.

My view is that it is entirely physically possible to achieve sustained global abundance through an algae based economy.  This is not an irresponsible fantasy but a practical reform agenda.  Putting our eggs in the basket of sacrificing wealth by reducing energy and resource use is actually the really irresponsible attitude, since it is a recipe for failure and conflict, whereas discussion of a technological path to universal abundance is a basis for successful stable global peace and justice.  The environmentalist ideology is a genuine barrier to progress when it stymies technological solutions.

We need to shift from a linear waste mentality to a culture of cyclic reuse. Such a shift could sustain vastly higher productivity and happiness than we now have.

My point here is counter-intuitive from a traditional linear view.  We naturally assume that the most wealthy cause the most damage.  But that ignores the role of education as a product of wealth in enabling biodiversity protection by improving understanding and accountability.  Among the real causes of biodiversity loss, one of the biggest factors is poverty, for example in the use of firewood for cooking and in activities of subsistence farmers to clear land.

I propose as a core reform to develop efficient industrial processes to grow algae on immense commercial scale at sea.   The results of that would be immediate direct protection of marine biodiversity by increasing the nutrient available at the base of the food chain, and also by stabilising the carbon cycle, enabling rapid removal of the excess carbon our linear methods have added to the air and water.

We need an unbending focus on the big picture, which is the question of how we can mine twenty billion tonnes of carbon from the air and sea each year.

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